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Thread: Finding empty radio frequencies

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    Official Lurker Christmascrazynana's Avatar
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    Default Finding empty radio frequencies

    At the April meeting I think someone spoke about a website that you could check for empty frequencies in your area for radio transmission. I can't find anything in my notes and wonder if anyone knows of this website.

    Thanks,
    Nancy

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    Space rented from Al SWood's Avatar
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    Default Re: Finding empty radio frequencies

    Shannon Wood
    XLights 4 User with 40,000 channels and 60,000 lights.
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    Professional Net Lurker Jack Stevens's Avatar
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    Default Re: Finding empty radio frequencies

    Keep in mind the list isn't 100% accurate. Use it as a guideline to start with, but check your reception for a station on a desired frequency before attempting to use it.

    Use a digital tuner, too, to make sure you're tuned to the frequency you think you are. Drive around your location a bit, make sure you get mostly, if not all, static and not a station.

    Most serious complaints come in when you "walk" on a commercial venture and block their advertising capabilities. Most commercial radio stations are at the upper end (higher frequencies) of the broadcast band; the lower frequencies tend to be NPR and educational stations. Again, not a hard fast rule, but it seems to hold true as a guideline.

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    Default Re: Finding empty radio frequencies

    Hey, Nancy, this may be too late for you.....sorry....I am using 90.5 and even with my new transmitter and antenna, I'm pretty sure we will not compete. so just do not go super amping on your side...

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    Trying to behave here-NOT John's Avatar
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    Default Re: Finding empty radio frequencies

    Quote Originally Posted by SWood View Post
    Just a caution when using this site:

    It is run by volunteers, and is not always up to date.

    Many times it does not list licensed Class D FM stations and also quite often misses locensed FM Translators.

    Always check any frequency both day and night from several blocks away before turning on your FM transmitter
    John (The Mascot)
    www.tennholidays.com

    480 LOR Channels + 2 CCR + 8 Mighty Minis + 10 Rainbow Floods+ 1 vdrive and vflood, Lynx Express and over 40,000 LEDs

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